Part 2: Five tips to create a soul-inspired habit

If you missed part 1 of this 2-part article, click here to get it. I promised I’d share with you my five tips to create a soul-inspired habit, which is our goal for your marketing. Just like anything you’d like to change, making money consistently in your business is done through marketing. Here are the five things that have helped me and my clients the most: 1. Simplify it When people aren’t taking action on their marketing plan, most of the time, it’s because it’s complicated like crazy. when it’s complicated, you’re tired before you even start. Simplify it. What is ONE thing you can do today to grow your business? Just one. And then do it. 2. Stack it As a nerd, I love knowing why things work. Not just because someone said so and you’re supposed to do certain things. The inner rebel in me just doesn’t buy it. While studying how habits are formed, I’ve been fascinated to learn how the brain works to support our habits. One way that you start shifting the way your brain fires its beautiful synapses (the things that make you do the stuff you do without having to really think about it), is to stack the habit you are wanting to create with something you already do. For example, if you want to start working out, what is something you already do three times a week and you can just pair it together? Maybe it’s to take your son to preschool so instead of going home for the 2.5 hours to just turn around and go pick him up, you...
Part 1: It’s overwhelming until it becomes a habit

Part 1: It’s overwhelming until it becomes a habit

One of the most common things I hear from entrepreneurs about why they don’t market themselves is that it’s overwhelming. “I just don’t know what to do.” “How do you get it all done between taking care of clients, writing, creating content, the tech stuff, and then there’s life… and kids… and laundry.” “I don’t know how to do the tech stuff (and how do I afford to hire it out if I’m not making money?) The list goes on. I’d love to hear from you – what is your biggest challenge or resistance to marketing? Comment below. I love to know how I can serve you even better with my courses and content. The thing is, change is always overwhelming until it becomes a habit. Change is usually very inconvenient. There are always legit excuses and reasons for where we can spend our time. It’s annoying until we choose to make it a habit. This goes for your marketing, too. Think about something you’ve changed – maybe a habit in your relationship, or your health… what did it really take to change it? For example, earlier this year, I started doing Pilates. The few times I did it in the past, I loved it. But where we used to live, it took 40 minutes to get to a Pilates studio. I just wasn’t that committed to dedicating 90 minutes of driving time for a 50-minute class. Plus, I was out of the habit of working out – it had been years – so it was especially easy to not go or do any sort of workout. Last year...
Embracing Sales: The hefty price of making sales “bad”

Embracing Sales: The hefty price of making sales “bad”

I used to be really afraid of sales. I thought it was bad. I didn’t want to be like, “that.” Over the years, here’s what I’ve discovered: The very people I judged as being “too salesy” 🤑 actually had a comfort with money and asking for money that was very foreign to me. I could have learned a lot from them much sooner if I wasn’t so fixated on judging them. While some of the tactics I observed were out of integrity (in my opinion) and the focus was to do whatever it took to make the sale, even if it meant half-truths or fully lying, I didn’t separate the behavior and tactics from the simple act of selling. So I made it all wrong. The other thing that was happening was I was intimidated by people who were asking for 5- and even 6-figure sums of money for things I was charging hundreds or maybe a couple of thousand dollars for. “How dare they charge that?”  The universe has a way of bringing things full circle. Imagine my surprise when I received a heated message from someone asking how dare I charge a few hundred dollars for one of my courses and if I wanted to “do the right thing,” I should give it to people who couldn’t afford it. Or when someone told me that I was all about the money when I raised the price from $97 to $197 to attend my 3-day women’s conference. The person telling me this clearly had no idea the kind of funds it took to produce a 3-day event. Bottom...