Choosing to Market Beyond Pain Points

Choosing to Market Beyond Pain Points

If you’re a coach who’s dedicated to helping people transform something in their life, stop asking what’s their top challenge.
What can you ask instead? I share some empowering questions to get people out of pain points and INTO possibilities. You’ll feel a lot better about marketing this way and your clients will be empowered from the very beginning.

Why “I Need a Website” is often MORE than just a website

“I need a website.” “I need snazzy copy on my site to attract more clients, can you do that? Hmmm…I hear these things a lot and after asking a few questions, people can get overwhelmed by all of the moving parts included in a website. Do you just need a website? First, I’m going to talk about a “website” and how you probably don’t need just a website. Part 2 of this will be why good website copy costs more than $500. 🙂 People come to me thinking they need a website, but they actually require a few other things BEFORE they can get a website created that reflects who they are and that actually works for them. What’s in a website? A website is a marketing tool. Ideally, it’s something that helps you make money in your business. It’s not just slapping up a few pages online with a clipart logo and saying “good enough.” It also doesn’t mean spending $10,000 on a site when you don’t have a paying client yet or know what you are offering in your business. Here are a couple of questions that will guide you to know what you really need so when you get quotes to create a website, you’re getting accurate numbers and have realistic expectations. 1. Do you have a clear and compelling message (you know what you do and who you do it for) Side note on this one – your message is NOT your certification or modality. It’s YOU – your essence, what makes you unique and stand out. If you have a certification that is the...

Six Coaching Myths + 15 things I Know for Sure

(You can listen to this below too) I’ve been in business for almost ten years and I’ve seen a lot and learned a lot in this industry. The first time I seriously considered getting out of the coaching biz was in 2012 when I burned my business down. (That’s another story for another day.) I was disheartened by what I was seeing as the “norm,” particularly in the live event space. It was a wake-up call for me to assess what I wanted to create in my business, with my clients, and in the world. These were just some of the questions I had from the models I saw: Was there another way to make money that wasn’t based on ‘overcoming objections’ and convincing people to buy stuff? Could people make 5- and 6-figure paydays from their live events without the fear-based selling? Could I create a leveraged business model that still had a high-touch component with my clients? Was the only way to grow my business to get a fancy brick and mortar office and hire full-time staff? Did I have to post the lifestyle shots on social media that showed everyone how great my life was? After considering these questions and finding a path that resonated much better with me, I’ve come a long way and I’ve seen a lot in this industry. There are a few coaching myths that I just don’t buy into. I’d love to hear your thoughts below on this post or in my Facebook group. Myth #1: Charge what you’re worth. You are an infinite being, how can you possibly charge what...
Problem Solver or Solution Provider?

Problem Solver or Solution Provider?

Are you a Creator of Possibilities or a Problem Solver? This may not be what you think it is. Traditional marketing is about finding someone’s pain or problem and solving it. “What problem does your ideal client have? Find that then sell them something to solve it.” That has been advice I’ve received for over a decade now and while there’s some truth in this, I wonder what would show up in your bank account if you went beyond this obvious and overdone formula? There is a difference between “solving a problem” and “CREATING possibilities.” I have a philosophy about this that has been radically been changing my business, joy, and profits for the past couple of years. This principle of “solving a problem” vs “creating a possibility” shows up everywhere and I see this being the difference between ultimately empowering your client vs enabling them. Solving a problem puts out fires. Being a creator of possibilities generates far beyond the immediate problem to solve. Have you noticed that solving a problem begets yet another problem and a continuous cycle of putting out fires can be the norm? As you read through these simple examples, notice how they feel in your body? Is one more expansive than the other? You could end up taking the same actions with either scenario, but which one will create longer-lasting results? Which one is more likely to get sabotaged in self-doubt or beating yourself up? I need $1,000 to pay this bill. OR I would like to always have $1,000 in my bank account after all of my bills are paid. Or the...
Why we stay silent – my thoughts about the world and what we can change

Why we stay silent – my thoughts about the world and what we can change

Today, I had scheduled an email promoting my newest class about messaging. This needed to be shared first. It’s an interesting line we play with – run our businesses and market our stuff and use our voice to create a different possibility on the planet – and ideally, do both. If you’ve watched anything on Facebook in the past few days or the news, you’ve seen the events occurring in the world, particularly in Virginia this past weekend. The question that I deeply wonder about is, “Is what I’m doing and being in my life and business making an impact on humanity in the way I desire it?” ==> And if not, what can I change right away to align my life and business with the stand I choose to BE in this world? I don’t know the answers for everyone. What I DO know is this: How we treat people matters. How we treat ourselves matters.   The way we run our businesses matters. What we speak up about matters. What we stay silent about matters. I also know that people process the world’s atrocities differently. It’s ironic to me that these atrocities start with judgment that turns to violence, yet we judge people for what they do or don’t do based on what they post on social media. (Oh, she must not give a shit about what’s happening in Charlotteville because she posted about peaches and her succulent on Instagram.) But that judgment topic is for another article I will write at another time… This is about why we stay silent and what do we do to...